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UW-Milwaukee
UW–Oshkosh
UW-Platteville
UW-River Falls
UW-Stevens Point

Earn your Bachelor’s in Applied Computing–100% Online

Applied computing is the study of both theoretical and applied computer science. Considered the intersection of information technology, computer science, and business, applied computing focuses on technical computing concepts and the development of skills in organizational leadership and business strategy.

Organizations across industries need computing professionals that are great programmers, and can drive business success with skills like project management, communication, and IT strategy. Designed for working adults, the Bachelor’s in Applied Computing degree completion program will help you develop skills in both programming technology and business to prepare you to stand out and secure your spot in this growing field.

Future-focused Learning.

The UW Applied Computing program proves to employers that you have the tools required to solve their organization’s day-to-day technical and operational issues. More importantly, it teaches you how to develop new technologies and participate in future tech innovation so you’ll know how to fix tomorrow’s problems.

Technology and Business Combined.

Today’s employers need well-rounded IT professionals. This unique computer science curriculum has a sharp focus on business skills like project management, IS strategy, and legal and ethical issues, so you can use your technical expertise to propel the organization forward.

Real-world Application.

Because the program was designed with working adults in mind, skills are combined and taught in the same way professionals utilize them day-to-day in the workplace. With the capstone course, you’ll get a chance to apply your knowledge to a real-world project, giving you the practical experience employers will notice. This applied program will teach you current technologies, as well as the techniques you need to successfully learn future technology systems to keep you ahead of the IT curve.

Upon graduation, you will be well prepared to make things possible in organizations public and private, in virtually any industry: healthcare, computer science, information technology, retail, marketing, manufacturing, transportation, communication, education, insurance, finance, science, security, law enforcement, and more. The dual-natured curriculum focuses both on developing a strong technical foundation, as well as the nuanced professional skills required to thrive in any IT role.

Completing this applied degree will indicate to employers that you’re skilled in the hands-on application of the tools and technologies you’ll need on a day-to-day basis.  This degree can be the foundation for a variety of positions, including:

  • Database developer
  • Systems administrator
  • Application/full stack developer
  • Software engineer
  • Video game developer
  • Business analyst
  • Web developer
  • Project manager

Who Should Apply?

The UW Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing is intended for individuals who would like to advance their current role in IT or those who would like to change careers to pursue this in-demand field. Working parents, professionals, and veterans will find the flexibility of online courses especially convenient.

As a bachelor’s completion program, the applied computing degree is a great option for anyone with existing, transferable college credits who wants to complete their degree.  Ideal candidates will hold at least 45-60* general education credits and can come from nearly any professional field. Your Success Coach at UW Extended Campus can help you find a program to complete your general education requirements. *See admission tab for more specific information.

UW System Collaboration

The UW Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing is a collaboration of the University of Wisconsin Extended Campus and UW-Milwaukee, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Platteville, UW-River Falls, and UW-Stevens Point, bringing you the best and brightest IT instructors from across the UW System. Learn more about our campus partners and choosing a home campus.

Accreditation

The UW Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing program is approved by the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents and approved by the Higher Learning Commission.

 

To be eligible for the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing students must meet the following requirements:

  • Approximately 45-60 transferable general education credits with a 2.0 minimum grade point average (GPA). There are options available for those who do not meet this general education requirement, such as potentially taking them through your chosen home campus or through one of these associate degrees.  Please contact an enrollment adviser for more information and to find out what options may be available to you.
  • Prerequisite coursework in college algebra or equivalent coursework
  • Official college transcripts

Application Deadlines

All application materials need to be completed two weeks prior to the semester start to be considered for admission. Starting your application early will help ensure you have plenty of time to gather required materials (such as transcripts), transfer credits, apply for financial aid, and complete the University of Wisconsin System Online Admission Application.

How to Apply

While you are free to apply on your own, many prospective students speak with an enrollment adviser first. Our friendly staff is here to answer your questions, talk with you about your career goals, and help you decide if this program is a good choice for you.

Step 1. Select a “home” campus from our list of program partners: UW-Milwaukee, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Platteville, UW-River Falls, or UW-Stevens Point.

Step 2. Apply to your preferred home campus using the University of Wisconsin System Online Admission Application. There is no application fee for all undergraduate degree seeking applicants (domestic and international).

Step 3. Send official college transcripts from all institutions attended directly to the home campus admissions office to which you are applying.  If you have an associate degree, bachelor’s degree, or equivalent coursework, the ACT or SAT is not required.

Formal admission to the program will be determined by the campus to which you apply.

The UW Applied Computing Program Curriculum

The UW Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing offers 100% online courses. All course content, from multimedia lectures and e-learning tools to homework assignments, will be delivered to you through the program’s online learning management system. You can study and do homework whenever and wherever it’s convenient for you.

Students are required to take each of the 21 technical- and business-focused courses in the curriculum. Due to the unique nature of the program, courses from other degree programs may not transfer in directly for Applied Computing courses. Only your home campus can determine how previous coursework might satisfy Applied Computing requirements.

 

CourseCredits

This course offers an introduction to history of computing, fundamental computer concepts and structured programming techniques. Java will be used to teach the basic concepts of program analysis, design, implementation, debugging and testing. It provides hands-on coverage of simple data types, problem solving, program design, conditional execution, loops, and basic user defined methods.

APC 300 syllabus

 

3 Credits

This course covers topics that serve as the foundation for general computer science practice including logic, sets, functions, mathematical reasoning, counting, probability, relations, graphs, trees, Boolean algebra, and algorithms.

APC 310 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the major functional areas of business including the roles of accounting, finance, human resources, marketing, information systems, and operations in the organization.  In addition, the role of business in a free enterprise system, business ethics, leadership, leading change and the competitive global business environment will be covered.

APC 320 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course covers technical and professional communication skills and techniques. Practice in creating effective memos and reports, developing technical materials, delivering presentations, and developing team communication skills will be the focus of the course.

APC 330 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course explores a range of legal, regulatory, ethical and compliance issues associated with developing software and using information systems in an organization. Topics include the ethical and legal issues associated with data privacy and intellectual property, compliance with regulatory requirements such as Sarbanes Oxley, and other related contemporary subjects.

APC 340 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course offers continuation of fundamental computer concepts and Programming. It provides hands-on coverage of Methods, File IO, Arrays and their applications, Abstract Data Types, Classes, simple GUI application, and introduction to inheritance and composition.

APC 350 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 310 – Math for Computer Science
3 Credits

This course covers design and implementation of relational database management systems to support computer-based information systems. Topics include: data modeling techniques such as entity-relationship modeling, extended entity-relationship modeling, database normalization techniques, and basic and advanced features of database query language SQL.

APC 360 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
3 Credits

This course explores the first five phases of the Systems Development Life Cycle including scope definition, problem analysis, requirements analysis, logical design and decision analysis with the goal of determining an effective system solution. Topics covered include Use Case development, gap analysis, financial analysis of IT investments, and feasibility analysis.

APC 370 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 320 – Introduction to Business
  • APC 330 – Technical and Professional Communication
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to project management tools and techniques including project selection and life cycle, stakeholder management, scope management, budget control, scheduling, quality management, risk identification, and procurement management.

APC 380 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 320 – Introduction to Business
  • APC 330 – Technical and Professional Communication
3 Credits

This course offers an introduction to Object-Oriented Programming techniques using the Java programming language. Students will gain skills in using Classes and Interfaces, Exception handling, Programming by Contract, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Overloading, Abstract Classes and Methods, Serialization, Generics, and an Introduction to Recursion.

APC 390 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers fundamental concepts in the design, configuration, and problem solving of computer networks. Topics include: TCP/IP and OSI architecture, application layer (Web, FTP, remote connection, email, client and server interaction), transport layer (TCP/UDP), network layer (IP), data link and physical layers.

APC 400 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers architecture and use-cases of non-relational (NoSQL) based on four types of databases including document, Graph, Key-value, and wide column store. Topics include: data types, create/update/delete data, query, cursors, indexing, dynamic schema design, scalability (scale-out) over scale-up of RDBMS, analysis of massive unstructured and semi-structured data and data security.

APC 410 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
3 Credits

This course covers topics spanning security and risk management, security engineering, identity and access management, and security operations. Topics include cryptography, access control models, malicious software and countermeasures, security policy, security model, trust, vulnerability assessment, security standards and evaluation, administration and auditing, and secure storage.

APC 420 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers fundamental concepts and the application of data structures and algorithms. Topics may include abstract data type, dynamic array, iterators, linked list, generics, stacks, queues, binary search tree, collections, maps, hashing, graphs, and sorting. It introduces a variety of application scenarios including graphics, web programming and user interfaces.

APC 430 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 390 – Object Oriented Programming
3 Credits

This course teaches students how to create advanced and interactive websites using technologies like HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Bootstrap, XML, web services, and database integration within the ASP.Net platform. The class also introduces principles of good user interaction design to the creation of effective web pages.

APC 440 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
3 Credits

This course provides introduction to important operating systems concepts such as processes, threads, scheduling, concurrency control and memory management. The students will learn these concepts via systems programming using POSIX API.

APC 450_Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 430 – Applied Data Structures and Algorithms
3 Credits

This course covers basic software development methodologies and tools. Methodologies include the waterfall, iterative and agile approaches. Tools include integrated development environments (IDEs), unified modeling language (UML), and testing frameworks. Other topics include requirements analysis, object-oriented analysis, test-driven development, and design patterns. Students will work on a team software project.

APC 460 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 370 – Systems Analysis and Design
  • APC 390 – Object Oriented Programming
3 Credits

This course begins with an exploration of organizational strategy and how Information Systems strategy is developed to support the attainment of organizational goals. The course then explores the management of the IS function using a capability maturity model approach to topics such as budgeting, acquisition, service management, change management, and personnel.

APC 470 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 380 – Project Management Techniques
3 Credits

This course covers topics spanning communication and network security, security assessment and testing, software development security, and asset security. Specific topics include operating system security, network security (e.g. firewalls, tunneling, intrusion detection, and wireless networking), browser security, and application security (e.g. database security, email security, payment system security, and digital-rights management).

APC 480 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
  • APC 400 – Applied Communication Networks
  • APC 420 – Computer Security I
  • APC 450 – Operating Systems Theory and Practice
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is for students to choose a capstone project, create an initial plan with specific deliverables identified, and receive approval. This course covers review of key concepts necessary for success in the Capstone (APC 495) course, including software engineering practices, project management techniques, systems analysis, and communicating with technical or non-technical audiences (CTO, IT staff, etc.). May include additional topics specific to anticipated capstone projects.

Concurrent Course: APC 460 (Students may take this course after completing APC 460 or they can take the two courses at the same time.)

APC 490 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 380 – Project Management Techniques
  • APC 460 – Software Engineering Practices

Capstone Project Ideas

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is for students to complete the project that was approved in APC 490. This course covers development, management and delivery of an applied computer science project for a client, including communication of project requirements and status to a non-technical audience.

For inspiration and ideas, explore past capstone projects.

APC 495 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 490 – Capstone Project Preparation
3 Credits

Fall 2022

Course Preview Week: August 30 - September 05, 2022
Semester Dates: September 06 - December 16, 2022

CourseCredits

This course offers an introduction to history of computing, fundamental computer concepts and structured programming techniques. Java will be used to teach the basic concepts of program analysis, design, implementation, debugging and testing. It provides hands-on coverage of simple data types, problem solving, program design, conditional execution, loops, and basic user defined methods.

APC 300 syllabus

 

3 Credits

This course covers topics that serve as the foundation for general computer science practice including logic, sets, functions, mathematical reasoning, counting, probability, relations, graphs, trees, Boolean algebra, and algorithms.

APC 310 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the major functional areas of business including the roles of accounting, finance, human resources, marketing, information systems, and operations in the organization.  In addition, the role of business in a free enterprise system, business ethics, leadership, leading change and the competitive global business environment will be covered.

APC 320 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course covers technical and professional communication skills and techniques. Practice in creating effective memos and reports, developing technical materials, delivering presentations, and developing team communication skills will be the focus of the course.

APC 330 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course covers design and implementation of relational database management systems to support computer-based information systems. Topics include: data modeling techniques such as entity-relationship modeling, extended entity-relationship modeling, database normalization techniques, and basic and advanced features of database query language SQL.

APC 360 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
3 Credits

This course offers an introduction to Object-Oriented Programming techniques using the Java programming language. Students will gain skills in using Classes and Interfaces, Exception handling, Programming by Contract, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Overloading, Abstract Classes and Methods, Serialization, Generics, and an Introduction to Recursion.

APC 390 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers fundamental concepts in the design, configuration, and problem solving of computer networks. Topics include: TCP/IP and OSI architecture, application layer (Web, FTP, remote connection, email, client and server interaction), transport layer (TCP/UDP), network layer (IP), data link and physical layers.

APC 400 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers architecture and use-cases of non-relational (NoSQL) based on four types of databases including document, Graph, Key-value, and wide column store. Topics include: data types, create/update/delete data, query, cursors, indexing, dynamic schema design, scalability (scale-out) over scale-up of RDBMS, analysis of massive unstructured and semi-structured data and data security.

APC 410 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
3 Credits

This course covers topics spanning security and risk management, security engineering, identity and access management, and security operations. Topics include cryptography, access control models, malicious software and countermeasures, security policy, security model, trust, vulnerability assessment, security standards and evaluation, administration and auditing, and secure storage.

APC 420 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course provides introduction to important operating systems concepts such as processes, threads, scheduling, concurrency control and memory management. The students will learn these concepts via systems programming using POSIX API.

APC 450_Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 430 – Applied Data Structures and Algorithms
3 Credits

This course begins with an exploration of organizational strategy and how Information Systems strategy is developed to support the attainment of organizational goals. The course then explores the management of the IS function using a capability maturity model approach to topics such as budgeting, acquisition, service management, change management, and personnel.

APC 470 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 380 – Project Management Techniques
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is for students to choose a capstone project, create an initial plan with specific deliverables identified, and receive approval. This course covers review of key concepts necessary for success in the Capstone (APC 495) course, including software engineering practices, project management techniques, systems analysis, and communicating with technical or non-technical audiences (CTO, IT staff, etc.). May include additional topics specific to anticipated capstone projects.

Concurrent Course: APC 460 (Students may take this course after completing APC 460 or they can take the two courses at the same time.)

APC 490 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 380 – Project Management Techniques
  • APC 460 – Software Engineering Practices

Capstone Project Ideas

3 Credits

Spring 2023

Request Permission Number

Course Preview Week: January 17 - January 23, 2023
Semester Dates: January 24 - May 05, 2023

CourseCredits

This course offers an introduction to history of computing, fundamental computer concepts and structured programming techniques. Java will be used to teach the basic concepts of program analysis, design, implementation, debugging and testing. It provides hands-on coverage of simple data types, problem solving, program design, conditional execution, loops, and basic user defined methods.

APC 300 syllabus

 

3 Credits

This course covers topics that serve as the foundation for general computer science practice including logic, sets, functions, mathematical reasoning, counting, probability, relations, graphs, trees, Boolean algebra, and algorithms.

APC 310 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the major functional areas of business including the roles of accounting, finance, human resources, marketing, information systems, and operations in the organization.  In addition, the role of business in a free enterprise system, business ethics, leadership, leading change and the competitive global business environment will be covered.

APC 320 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course explores a range of legal, regulatory, ethical and compliance issues associated with developing software and using information systems in an organization. Topics include the ethical and legal issues associated with data privacy and intellectual property, compliance with regulatory requirements such as Sarbanes Oxley, and other related contemporary subjects.

APC 340 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course offers continuation of fundamental computer concepts and Programming. It provides hands-on coverage of Methods, File IO, Arrays and their applications, Abstract Data Types, Classes, simple GUI application, and introduction to inheritance and composition.

APC 350 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 310 – Math for Computer Science
3 Credits

This course covers design and implementation of relational database management systems to support computer-based information systems. Topics include: data modeling techniques such as entity-relationship modeling, extended entity-relationship modeling, database normalization techniques, and basic and advanced features of database query language SQL.

APC 360 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
3 Credits

This course explores the first five phases of the Systems Development Life Cycle including scope definition, problem analysis, requirements analysis, logical design and decision analysis with the goal of determining an effective system solution. Topics covered include Use Case development, gap analysis, financial analysis of IT investments, and feasibility analysis.

APC 370 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 320 – Introduction to Business
  • APC 330 – Technical and Professional Communication
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to project management tools and techniques including project selection and life cycle, stakeholder management, scope management, budget control, scheduling, quality management, risk identification, and procurement management.

APC 380 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 320 – Introduction to Business
  • APC 330 – Technical and Professional Communication
3 Credits

This course covers fundamental concepts and the application of data structures and algorithms. Topics may include abstract data type, dynamic array, iterators, linked list, generics, stacks, queues, binary search tree, collections, maps, hashing, graphs, and sorting. It introduces a variety of application scenarios including graphics, web programming and user interfaces.

APC 430 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 390 – Object Oriented Programming
3 Credits

This course teaches students how to create advanced and interactive websites using technologies like HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Bootstrap, XML, web services, and database integration within the ASP.Net platform. The class also introduces principles of good user interaction design to the creation of effective web pages.

APC 440 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
3 Credits

This course covers basic software development methodologies and tools. Methodologies include the waterfall, iterative and agile approaches. Tools include integrated development environments (IDEs), unified modeling language (UML), and testing frameworks. Other topics include requirements analysis, object-oriented analysis, test-driven development, and design patterns. Students will work on a team software project.

APC 460 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 370 – Systems Analysis and Design
  • APC 390 – Object Oriented Programming
3 Credits

This course covers topics spanning communication and network security, security assessment and testing, software development security, and asset security. Specific topics include operating system security, network security (e.g. firewalls, tunneling, intrusion detection, and wireless networking), browser security, and application security (e.g. database security, email security, payment system security, and digital-rights management).

APC 480 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
  • APC 400 – Applied Communication Networks
  • APC 420 – Computer Security I
  • APC 450 – Operating Systems Theory and Practice
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is for students to complete the project that was approved in APC 490. This course covers development, management and delivery of an applied computer science project for a client, including communication of project requirements and status to a non-technical audience.

For inspiration and ideas, explore past capstone projects.

APC 495 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 490 – Capstone Project Preparation
3 Credits

Summer 2023

Registration Opens: March 13, 2023
Course Preview Week: May 23 - May 29, 2023
Semester Dates: May 30 - August 11, 2023

CourseCredits

This course offers an introduction to history of computing, fundamental computer concepts and structured programming techniques. Java will be used to teach the basic concepts of program analysis, design, implementation, debugging and testing. It provides hands-on coverage of simple data types, problem solving, program design, conditional execution, loops, and basic user defined methods.

APC 300 syllabus

 

3 Credits

This course explores a range of legal, regulatory, ethical and compliance issues associated with developing software and using information systems in an organization. Topics include the ethical and legal issues associated with data privacy and intellectual property, compliance with regulatory requirements such as Sarbanes Oxley, and other related contemporary subjects.

APC 340 Syllabus

3 Credits

This course offers continuation of fundamental computer concepts and Programming. It provides hands-on coverage of Methods, File IO, Arrays and their applications, Abstract Data Types, Classes, simple GUI application, and introduction to inheritance and composition.

APC 350 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 300 – Programming I
  • APC 310 – Math for Computer Science
3 Credits

This course covers fundamental concepts in the design, configuration, and problem solving of computer networks. Topics include: TCP/IP and OSI architecture, application layer (Web, FTP, remote connection, email, client and server interaction), transport layer (TCP/UDP), network layer (IP), data link and physical layers.

APC 400 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers topics spanning security and risk management, security engineering, identity and access management, and security operations. Topics include cryptography, access control models, malicious software and countermeasures, security policy, security model, trust, vulnerability assessment, security standards and evaluation, administration and auditing, and secure storage.

APC 420 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 350 – Programming II
3 Credits

This course covers fundamental concepts and the application of data structures and algorithms. Topics may include abstract data type, dynamic array, iterators, linked list, generics, stacks, queues, binary search tree, collections, maps, hashing, graphs, and sorting. It introduces a variety of application scenarios including graphics, web programming and user interfaces.

APC 430 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 390 – Object Oriented Programming
3 Credits

This course teaches students how to create advanced and interactive websites using technologies like HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Bootstrap, XML, web services, and database integration within the ASP.Net platform. The class also introduces principles of good user interaction design to the creation of effective web pages.

APC 440 Syllabus

Prerequisites

  • APC 360 – Database Management I
3 Credits
The University of Wisconsin Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing program prepares IT professionals to transform computer science from theory to practice and solve the everyday technical issues that organizations face.

Upon completion of your bachelor’s degree, you will possess the following IT skills and abilities:

Demonstrate a solid foundation in core computer science

You will be able to:

  • Apply fundamental programming knowledge and techniques to write software of varying complexities.
  • Use standard data structures and algorithms within the software development process.
  • Develop software using operating system theories and concepts.
  • Understand computer networks, protocols, and devices.
  • Describe the professional, ethical, and social issues facing the computing field.

Demonstrate a strong understanding of software engineering practices

You will be able to:

  • Analyze a problem and identify the computing-based solution.
  • Design and create software to support the solution.
  • Test software to ensure it meets standards and requirements.
  • Document software and its development process.

Recognize and address security issues

You will be able to:

  • Describe the features necessary to implement an effective comprehensive security plan for an organization.
  • Utilize best practices in security engineering when developing software and managing data.
  • Describe the privacy, legal, and regulatory requirements under which systems operate.

Implement a computing solution for a business problem

You will be able to:

  • Apply agile and traditional project management processes when developing systems.
  • Use systems-analysis tactics to solve a business problem.
  • Describe the role and responsibilities of the functional areas of business.
  • Evaluate and make recommendations for implementing specific computing technologies.
  • Recognize the role of IT in supporting organizational process and strategy.

Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills

You will be able to:

  • Write, format, disseminate, and orally communicate technical materials.
  • Help non-technical professionals visualize, explore, and act on technical information.
  • Facilitate discussions through listening, questioning, and presenting.
  • Collaborate towards a shared goal in a variety of environments, including virtual and multi-disciplinary.

Demonstrate a solid foundation in data management

You will be able to:

  • Design and implement relational and non-relational database systems to support an organization’s information systems.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of relevant data management issues.

 

Tuition for the online Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing is a flat fee of $525 per credit whether you live in Wisconsin or out of state.

There are no additional course or program fees, however, textbooks are purchased separately and are not included in tuition. As this is an online program, you will not pay segregated fees—fees in addition to tuition that cover the costs of student-organized activities, facility maintenance, and operations. Also you will not be charged a technology fee as part of this program. If software or special technology is required in one of your courses it will be provided to you and is included in your tuition.

Financial Aid

Financial aid may be available to you as a returning adult student and is awarded by your home campus. Learn more about our campus partners and choosing a home campus.

Your first step when applying for federal and state financial aid is completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Please check with your home campus regarding minimum credits required to qualify for financial aid as a full- or part-time student.

Veteran Benefits 

Benefits are available to qualifying veterans and those currently serving. Contact your home campus veteran services office for details.

Ways to Pay for Your Degree

As a returning adult student, you may consider the following sources of financial aid to help with the cost of your online degree:

  • Grants—award is usually based on financial need. Grants, unlike loans, generally do not have to be repaid.
  • Scholarships—usually based on academic merit, financial need, or other criteria, awarded by a wide range of organizations. Scholarships do not need to be repaid.
  • Loans—a loan is money you borrow and must pay back with interest. Student loans are available from the federal government, private sources such as a bank or financial institution, or other sources. Federal student loans usually have lower interest rates than private loans, and offer flexible repayment plans.
  • Military benefits—aid available to eligible veterans and current members of the military.
  • Tuition reimbursement—a benefit offered by companies to their employees to help pay for education. Ask your human resources department if your company offers this benefit.
  • Education tax benefits—research possible tax benefits with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).