Request Information

Download the program guide for details on admission requirements, tuition, and courses.

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

UW-Green Bay

Learn how to protect our natural world for future generations.

Earn your master’s degree in Biodiversity Conservation and Management or a graduate certificate in biodiversity science, data management, or conservation leadership from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay—100% online.

The program offers flexibility to earn the master’s degree or one or more certificates. Three of the certificates are stackable—by completing all three certificates plus the capstone project you’ll earn the master’s degree. A foundational certificate is also offered for those seeking an introduction to the field.

  • Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management
  • Graduate Certificate in Biodiversity and Conservation Science (stackable)
  • Graduate Certificate in Conservation Data Management and Analysis (stackable)
  • Graduate Certificate in Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management (stackable)
  • Graduate Certificate in Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management (foundational)

In the Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management, you’ll gain the skills and knowledge to manage complex conservation challenges facing the world today, such as climate change, managing threatened and endangered species, restoration and remediation of environmental damages, and balancing multiple recreational uses, while integrating the human perspective through community engagement and culturally responsible conservation practices.

In the program, you’ll explore topics in biodiversity science, data management, and conservation leadership, such as:

  • conservation research project design,
  • how to communicate project results and engage with diverse audiences,
  • conservation ethics and culturally responsible conservation practices,
  • data analytics and visualization,
  • project management, including writing grants, building partnerships, and budgeting, and
  • leadership, community engagement, and team-building skills.

Courses are completed entirely online, in asynchronous format, with zero on-campus, virtual, or in-person meeting requirements, an ideal format for busy professionals. Watch lectures, participate in online forums with your classmates, and although assignments have deadlines, do homework whenever it’s convenient for you. Learn more about online learning with UW Extended Campus.


What is a stackable certificate?

Stackable credentials allow you to build your skills and your career on your own schedule, over time, whether you choose to earn the master’s degree or focus on developing skills in a specific area of concentration: biodiversity science, data management, or conservation leadership.

You may choose to:

  • earn a certificate that develops a specific set of skills and knowledge,
  • start by earning one certificate and progress through the program at your own pace by adding the other two certificates plus the capstone later, or
  • earn the master’s degree by completing the entire curriculum including the capstone.

You can start any semester and take courses and certificates in any sequence.


New to biodiversity and conservation management? Start with a foundational certificate.

If you are new to biodiversity and conservation management, the Graduate Certificate in Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management (foundational certificate) provides an introduction to the field by covering topics in biodiversity science, data management, and conservation leadership. It is possible to complete the certificate in one year, making it an easy, accessible, and affordable option for students who would like to determine their level of interest in biodiversity and conservation management before investing significant time and money in a master’s degree program. Courses and credits earned in the foundational certificate apply to the stackable certificates and master’s degree, should you choose to continue in any of the programs.

Who Should Apply?

The Biodiversity Conservation and Management master’s degree and certificates in biodiversity science, data management, and conservation leadership are an ideal choice for those seeking to expand their skills and advance their career in conservation or environmental management who need the flexibility an online program offers. As a graduate, you’ll be qualified to pursue leadership and management roles within a variety of conservation organizations.

About UW-Green Bay

The Biodiversity Conservation and Management master’s degree and certificates in biodiversity science, data management, and conservation leadership are offered through UW-Green Bay’s College of Science, Engineering, and Technology. The College includes the nationally acclaimed Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI). UW-Green Bay is committed to fostering new and growing opportunities for students, faculty, and the community, in environmental science, conservation, and sustainability.

Courses in the program are developed and taught by faculty from UW-Green Bay with diverse research expertise in wildlife biology, community ecology, restoration ecology, ecophysiology, population genetics, molecular ecology, phylogenetics, evolutionary biology, ecological modeling, habitat management, and human interactions with the environment.

Accreditation

Whether online or on campus, University of Wisconsin programs have a reputation for delivering world-class education and student support. Accreditation is your assurance that you will graduate with skills that are relevant to your field and valued by employers. The Biodiversity Conservation and Management program is approved by the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents and is fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Admission and application requirements vary for the Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management and the certificate programs. Please review the following information carefully. UW-Green Bay may waive some of these requirements as part of the comprehensive application process.

To be eligible for the Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management, students must meet the following requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree, in any discipline, from an accredited university (min. 3.0 GPA).

Students with a GPA of less than 3.0 may be considered for provisional admission and should contact an enrollment adviser for more information.

Aptitude tests, such as the GRE, are not required for admission.

You will also need to submit the following application materials:

  • official college transcripts,
  • your resume,
  • two letters of recommendation (professional or academic) using the letter of evaluation form, and
  • a personal statement of up to 1,000 words describing the reasons behind your decision to pursue this degree.

To be eligible for any of the certificate programs, students must meet the following requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree, in any discipline, from an accredited university (no min. GPA required).

Aptitude tests, such as the GRE, are not required for admission.

You will also need to submit the following application materials:

  • official college transcripts*.

*If you completed your bachelor’s degree at UW-Green Bay you do not have to submit official transcripts.

International Guidelines

This program welcomes online students from around the world. Online students do not qualify for an F-1 Student Visa to travel to the U.S., but instead can participate in our online courses remotely. If your native language is not English and/or you attended school outside of the U.S., you will likely need to provide proof of English language proficiency and an official translation or evaluation of academic transcripts. Requirements will vary based on a student’s academic history and home campus policies. For guidance about these requirements and how they apply to your specific situation, contact the UW-Green Bay graduate admissions office.

If you would like to apply as an International Student for an on-campus program in the UW System please refer to these resources through UW-HELP.

Application Deadline

All application materials need to be completed two weeks prior to the semester start to be considered for admission.

Are there specific enrollment/start times?

You may start the Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management, or any of the certificate programs, at the beginning of any semester. Fall semester begins in early September, spring semester in late January, and summer semester in early June.

How to Apply

While you are free to apply on your own, many prospective students find it helpful to speak with an enrollment adviser first.

Step 1. Visit the University of Wisconsin System Online Admission Application to login or create an account.

Step 2. Apply to UW-Green Bay and select “Biodiversity Conservation and Management-Online”. A nonrefundable $56 application fee is required for most graduate degree-seeking students applying to a UW System institution.  *For a limited time, UW Extended Campus is offering an application fee waiver to those who haven’t yet applied for the Summer or Fall 2024 semesters. To redeem, use coupon code APPLY24 on the UW Online Application payment page.

Step 3. Send your resume, personal statement, and letters of recommendation; and arrange to have your official college transcripts (from each institution you attended) sent to the UW-Green Bay graduate student admissions office.

Step 1. Visit the University of Wisconsin System Online Admission Application to login or create an account.

Step 2. Apply to UW-Green Bay as a “Graduate Special Student” and select “Biodiversity and Conservation Science-Certificate”, “Conservation Data Management and Analysis-Certificate”, “Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management-Certificate”, or “Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management-Certificate”, as applicable.

Step 3. Arrange to have your official college transcripts (from each institution you attended) sent to the UW-Green Bay graduate student admissions office. Note: if you completed your bachelor’s degree at UW-Green Bay you do not have to submit official transcripts.

Please request electronic transcripts, if this service is offered by your previous school(s), to be sent directly to the admissions email. Electronic transcripts are usually delivered more quickly than physical copies sent by mail.

Flexibility to earn your degree or a certificate. 100% online.

Stackable credentials allow you to build your skills and career on your own schedule, over time, whether you choose to earn the master’s degree or focus on developing skills in a specific area of concentration by earning a certificate.

Courses explore the human aspect of conservation, and develop skills and knowledge in conservation ecology, data analytics and visualization, spatial mapping, emerging conservation technologies, conservation research and monitoring, policy implementation, conservation leadership and community engagement.

  • Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management (11 courses, 31 credits)
  • Graduate Certificate in Biodiversity and Conservation Science (stackable, 3 courses, 9 credits)
  • Graduate Certificate in Conservation Data Management and Analysis (stackable, 3 courses, 9 credits)
  • Graduate Certificate in Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management (stackable, 3 courses, 9 credits)
  • Graduate Certificate in Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management (foundational, 3 courses, 9 credits)

To earn the Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management (MS), students must complete all eleven courses (31 credits).

  • Nine courses (3 credits per course)
  • Capstone prep course (1 credit)
  • Capstone project course (3 credits)

In the capstone course, students gain valuable, practical experience through a fieldwork project. Students may be able to complete the project with their current employer, or arrange for project work with an external organization.

To earn any of the certificates, students must complete the three courses in the certificate curriculum (9 credits).

  • Three courses (3 credits per course)

The Graduate Certificate in Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management (F) consists of the first course in each of the stackable certificates (BCM 700 Conservation Ecology, BCM 705 Conservation Research and Monitoring, BCM 710 Conservation Design and Management).

Courses and certificates can be taken in any sequence, with the exception of the capstone prep and project courses, which are typically taken in the final semester once all program courses have been completed.

How long will it take to earn my degree or certificate?

Courses in the Biodiversity Conservation and Management program are offered all three semesters in rotation. Completion time depends on how many courses you take during a semester and whether you attend all three semesters. Students take 1-2 courses per semester, on average. It is possible to complete a certificate in one year. The program gives you the flexibility to formulate a completion plan with your academic advisor that takes into account time constraints such as work and personal obligations.

Biodiversity and Conservation Science-Graduate Certificate (BCS)

In this stackable certificate you'll focus on the principles of ecology and biodiversity, conservation planning, policy, the use of biological collections and taxonomic keys in conservation research and education, and explore approaches to conservation and land stewardship to address core conservation challenges.

CourseCredits

Principles of ecology and biodiversity through the lens of conservation planning and policy. Drawing from concepts across multiple disciplines at various spatial and temporal scales in the physical and biological sciences, exploring topics and applications such as watershed management, agricultural practices, wetland delineation, population viability analysis, and ecosystem assessment.

BCM 700 course syllabus

3 Credits

Explore species concepts, biogeography, and phylogenetics as they relate to conservation. Evaluate the curation and use of biological collections in conservation research and education. Practice using taxonomic keys and analyzing molecular data. Students will choose taxa of particular interest for a targeted project.

BCM 725 course syllabus

3 Credits

A survey of current and developing approaches to conservation and land stewardship. Explore principles and emerging methods relevant to invasive species management, prescribed fire, disturbance regimes, and core conservation challenges. Innovative tools and monitoring technologies are investigated, including literature review and application to individual projects.

3 Credits

Conservation Data Management and Analysis-Graduate Certificate (DMA)

In this stackable certificate you’ll start with an overview of research project design including tools for acquiring, managing, and presenting conservation data. Learn how to visualize, interpret, and communicate data with hands-on experience in current applications, and foundational concepts in mapping and geospatial analysis.

CourseCredits

Overview of current tools and best practices for designing research projects and acquiring, managing, and presenting conservation data. Topics include quality control, the importance of metadata, effective research design, statistical power, and other strategies for generating valid answers to important conservation questions.

BCM 705 course syllabus

3 Credits

Apply analytical tools to investigate, visualize, interpret, and communicate conservation data. Students will gain hands-on experience with applications such as the R Statistical Computing System, Microsoft Excel, and cloud-based data storage frameworks.

BCM 730 course syllabus

3 Credits

Foundational concepts in mapping and geospatial analysis as they apply to conservation. Process and utilize remotely sensed imagery and other geographic data. Hands-on experience using software for storing, managing, and displaying spatial information such as topography, vegetation, soil, and watershed data.

3 Credits

Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management-Graduate Certificate (LPM)

In this stackable certificate you’ll focus on conservation project management, including grant writing, budgeting, building partnerships, cultural competency, leading diverse teams, ethics and advocacy, strategic planning, communications, and developing an understanding of treaties, laws, and policies.

CourseCredits

Focuses on all aspects of conservation project management, including understanding context and culture, writing grants, building partnerships, developing and managing a budget, assessing outcomes and deliverables, and communicating project results with diverse audiences. Students will explore principles of adaptive management related to conservation projects.

BCM 710 course syllabus

3 Credits

Principles and application of conservation relating to complexities of the human relationship with nature. Investigate and integrate social science into management, understand treaties, laws and policies, realize economic and recreational aspects, and consider ethics and advocacy. Enhance cultural competency and build capabilities for communicating and engaging with diverse audiences.

BCM 720 course syllabus

3 Credits

Focuses on strategies and tools for leading and implementing collaborative conservation projects. Topics include engaging conservation partners and community volunteers, strategic planning and assessment, and communicating project progress and results to diverse audiences using mixed media. Exercises will enhance leadership and team-building skills relevant to conservation objectives.

3 Credits

Master's Capstone (MS)

A capstone project is required to earn the master's degree, and typically completed in the final semester.

CourseCredits

Prepares students for an applied self-directed capstone experience. Address problem identification, research, and project formulation. Culminates in an oral and written proposal with project schedule.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 15 credits, including at least one course in each of the three certificates: Biodiversity and Conservation Science, Conservation Data Management and Analysis, Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management.

1 Credits

The capstone course is an opportunity for students to apply what they have learned in the program by completing the proposed capstone project in a professional, laboratory, or field setting. The outcomes of the capstone project will be presented in a summary report.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of BCM 790.

3 Credits

Course availability for the Biodiversity Conservation and Management program varies each semester, and is subject to change due to fluctuating enrollment. If you are a current student, please consult with your campus adviser prior to registration.

Program indicators appear after each course title in the course schedule, as follows:

  • Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management (MS)
  • Graduate Certificate in Biodiversity and Conservation Science (BCS)
  • Graduate Certificate in Conservation Data Management and Analysis (DMA)
  • Graduate Certificate in Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management (LPM)
  • Graduate Certificate in Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management (F)

Spring 2024

Course Preview Week: January 16 - January 22, 2024
Semester Dates: January 23 - May 03, 2024

CourseCredits

Principles of ecology and biodiversity through the lens of conservation planning and policy. Drawing from concepts across multiple disciplines at various spatial and temporal scales in the physical and biological sciences, exploring topics and applications such as watershed management, agricultural practices, wetland delineation, population viability analysis, and ecosystem assessment.

BCM 700 course syllabus

3 Credits

Overview of current tools and best practices for designing research projects and acquiring, managing, and presenting conservation data. Topics include quality control, the importance of metadata, effective research design, statistical power, and other strategies for generating valid answers to important conservation questions.

BCM 705 course syllabus

3 Credits

Focuses on all aspects of conservation project management, including understanding context and culture, writing grants, building partnerships, developing and managing a budget, assessing outcomes and deliverables, and communicating project results with diverse audiences. Students will explore principles of adaptive management related to conservation projects.

BCM 710 course syllabus

3 Credits

Principles and application of conservation relating to complexities of the human relationship with nature. Investigate and integrate social science into management, understand treaties, laws and policies, realize economic and recreational aspects, and consider ethics and advocacy. Enhance cultural competency and build capabilities for communicating and engaging with diverse audiences.

BCM 720 course syllabus

3 Credits

Explore species concepts, biogeography, and phylogenetics as they relate to conservation. Evaluate the curation and use of biological collections in conservation research and education. Practice using taxonomic keys and analyzing molecular data. Students will choose taxa of particular interest for a targeted project.

BCM 725 course syllabus

3 Credits

Apply analytical tools to investigate, visualize, interpret, and communicate conservation data. Students will gain hands-on experience with applications such as the R Statistical Computing System, Microsoft Excel, and cloud-based data storage frameworks.

BCM 730 course syllabus

3 Credits

Summer 2024

Registration Opens: March 11, 2024
Course Preview Week: May 21 - May 27, 2024
Semester Dates: May 28 - August 09, 2024

CourseCredits

Principles of ecology and biodiversity through the lens of conservation planning and policy. Drawing from concepts across multiple disciplines at various spatial and temporal scales in the physical and biological sciences, exploring topics and applications such as watershed management, agricultural practices, wetland delineation, population viability analysis, and ecosystem assessment.

BCM 700 course syllabus

3 Credits

Overview of current tools and best practices for designing research projects and acquiring, managing, and presenting conservation data. Topics include quality control, the importance of metadata, effective research design, statistical power, and other strategies for generating valid answers to important conservation questions.

BCM 705 course syllabus

3 Credits

Focuses on all aspects of conservation project management, including understanding context and culture, writing grants, building partnerships, developing and managing a budget, assessing outcomes and deliverables, and communicating project results with diverse audiences. Students will explore principles of adaptive management related to conservation projects.

BCM 710 course syllabus

3 Credits

Focuses on strategies and tools for leading and implementing collaborative conservation projects. Topics include engaging conservation partners and community volunteers, strategic planning and assessment, and communicating project progress and results to diverse audiences using mixed media. Exercises will enhance leadership and team-building skills relevant to conservation objectives.

3 Credits

A survey of current and developing approaches to conservation and land stewardship. Explore principles and emerging methods relevant to invasive species management, prescribed fire, disturbance regimes, and core conservation challenges. Innovative tools and monitoring technologies are investigated, including literature review and application to individual projects.

3 Credits

Foundational concepts in mapping and geospatial analysis as they apply to conservation. Process and utilize remotely sensed imagery and other geographic data. Hands-on experience using software for storing, managing, and displaying spatial information such as topography, vegetation, soil, and watershed data.

3 Credits

Prepares students for an applied self-directed capstone experience. Address problem identification, research, and project formulation. Culminates in an oral and written proposal with project schedule.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 15 credits, including at least one course in each of the three certificates: Biodiversity and Conservation Science, Conservation Data Management and Analysis, Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management.

1 Credits

Fall 2024

Registration Opens: April 08, 2024
Course Preview Week: August 27 - September 02, 2024
Semester Dates: September 03 - December 13, 2024

CourseCredits

Principles of ecology and biodiversity through the lens of conservation planning and policy. Drawing from concepts across multiple disciplines at various spatial and temporal scales in the physical and biological sciences, exploring topics and applications such as watershed management, agricultural practices, wetland delineation, population viability analysis, and ecosystem assessment.

BCM 700 course syllabus

3 Credits

Overview of current tools and best practices for designing research projects and acquiring, managing, and presenting conservation data. Topics include quality control, the importance of metadata, effective research design, statistical power, and other strategies for generating valid answers to important conservation questions.

BCM 705 course syllabus

3 Credits

Focuses on all aspects of conservation project management, including understanding context and culture, writing grants, building partnerships, developing and managing a budget, assessing outcomes and deliverables, and communicating project results with diverse audiences. Students will explore principles of adaptive management related to conservation projects.

BCM 710 course syllabus

3 Credits

Principles and application of conservation relating to complexities of the human relationship with nature. Investigate and integrate social science into management, understand treaties, laws and policies, realize economic and recreational aspects, and consider ethics and advocacy. Enhance cultural competency and build capabilities for communicating and engaging with diverse audiences.

BCM 720 course syllabus

3 Credits

Explore species concepts, biogeography, and phylogenetics as they relate to conservation. Evaluate the curation and use of biological collections in conservation research and education. Practice using taxonomic keys and analyzing molecular data. Students will choose taxa of particular interest for a targeted project.

BCM 725 course syllabus

3 Credits

Apply analytical tools to investigate, visualize, interpret, and communicate conservation data. Students will gain hands-on experience with applications such as the R Statistical Computing System, Microsoft Excel, and cloud-based data storage frameworks.

BCM 730 course syllabus

3 Credits

Prepares students for an applied self-directed capstone experience. Address problem identification, research, and project formulation. Culminates in an oral and written proposal with project schedule.

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 15 credits, including at least one course in each of the three certificates: Biodiversity and Conservation Science, Conservation Data Management and Analysis, Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management.

1 Credits

The capstone course is an opportunity for students to apply what they have learned in the program by completing the proposed capstone project in a professional, laboratory, or field setting. The outcomes of the capstone project will be presented in a summary report.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of BCM 790.

3 Credits

The Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management was developed with advice from experts across various conservation and environmental management disciplines to prepare graduates for successful leadership roles in a variety of biodiversity conservation settings. Program outcomes are based on current standards and best practices.

Upon completion of your master’s degree, you will have achieved the following learning outcomes:

Conduct and communicate environmental research and monitoring.

  • Design and implement effective methods for collecting, managing, and interpreting environmental data.
  • Effectively communicate scientific information to diverse audiences and stakeholders.

Critically evaluate ethical implications and relevance of conservation initiatives through multiple lenses.

  • Consider the needs of diverse communities in culturally responsible conservation practices.
  • Evaluate how humans impact and are influenced by conservation and the natural world.

Interpret and comply with conservation regulations and policies.

  • Consider tribal rights, treaties, and First Nations sovereignty and communities in conservation practices.
  • Interpret local, state, and federal policies and regulations as they apply to conservation.

Cultivate and lead a collaborative and inclusive team representing diverse stakeholders.

  • Establish and engage a cross-functional team with diverse strengths to address conservation challenges.
  • Communicate information, gather feedback and build consensus to improve conservation efforts.

Design, implement and evaluate effective conservation projects.

  • Develop a competitive proposal to gain support for a conservation project.
  • Manage a complex project incorporating risk management, budget and personnel oversight, and outcomes assessment.
  • Apply principles of adaptive management to learn from previous actions and make necessary adjustments to improve outcomes.

Integrate ecological information in conservation planning and actions.

  • Use taxonomic keys and other resources to identify taxa relevant to conservation projects.
  • Interpret the role of the physical and biological environment in conservation planning and policy.
  • Curate and manage biological collections to support conservation, education, and outreach.

Adapt and apply innovative technology and ideas to conservation challenges.

  • Demonstrate familiarity with emerging technologies, ideas, and primary literature in conservation science and environmental management.
  • Utilize data tools to visualize environmental data on a landscape or ecosystem scale.
  • Collect, organize and analyze data using appropriate tools and techniques.

Tuition is a flat fee of $750 per credit. There are no additional course or program fees, with the exception of textbooks which are purchased separately.

  • You’ll pay the same tuition whether you live in Wisconsin or out of state.
  • You will not pay technology fees. If software or special technology is required in a course, it will be provided to you and is included in tuition.
  • You will not pay segregated fees (fees for student services, activities, programs, and facilities).
  • Textbooks are purchased separately and are not included in tuition.

How much will this cost?

  • Graduate certificate: $6,750 total for 9 credits.
  • Master’s degree: $23,250 total for 31 credits.

Financial Aid

Financial aid is awarded by UW-Green Bay. Students in the program are eligible to apply for UW-Green Bay scholarships. Aid is also available to eligible veterans and current members of the military, for more information contact UW-Green Bay Veteran’s Services. Students enrolling in the certificate programs are not eligible for financial aid.

Please check with UW-Green Bay regarding minimum credits required to qualify for financial aid as a full- or part-time student.

Ways to Pay for Your Degree

As a returning adult student, you may consider the following sources of financial assistance to help with the cost of your education:

  • Grants—award is usually based on financial need. Grants, unlike loans, generally do not have to be repaid.
  • Scholarships—usually based on academic merit, financial need, or other criteria, awarded by a wide range of organizations. Scholarships do not need to be repaid.
  • Loans—a loan is money you borrow and must pay back with interest. Student loans are available from the federal government, private sources such as a bank or financial institution, or other sources. Federal student loans usually have lower interest rates than private loans, and offer flexible repayment plans.
  • Military benefits—aid available to eligible veterans and current members of the military.
  • Tuition reimbursement—a benefit offered by companies to their employees to help pay for education. Ask your human resources department if your company offers this benefit.
  • Education tax benefits—research possible tax benefits with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

Your first step when applying for federal and state financial aid is completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Federal financial aid is distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Students who apply early have a better chance of receiving aid, including grant aid that does not have to be repaid.

The Biodiversity Conservation and Management program offers flexibility to earn the master’s degree or one or more certificates. Students enroll in our certificate programs for a variety of reasons, including to learn new skills that help them advance in their current field or change careers. It’s possible to complete a certificate in one year, making it a convenient option for those seeking professional development.

Each certificate is comprised of 3 courses (9 total credits) from the Master of Science in Biodiversity Conservation and Management. Three of the certificates are stackable—by completing all three stackable certificates plus the master’s capstone project you’ll earn the master’s degree. A foundational certificate is also offered for those seeking an introduction to the field.

Courses and credits earned in any of the certificates apply to master’s degree, should you choose to enroll.

Biodiversity and Conservation Science-Graduate Certificate (stackable)

  • You’ll focus on the principles of ecology and biodiversity, conservation planning, policy, the use of biological collections and taxonomic keys in conservation research and education, and explore approaches to conservation and land stewardship to address core conservation challenges.
  • Courses: BCM 700 Conservation Ecology; BCM 725 Evolution, Biodiversity, and Conservation; BCM 745 Emerging Conservation Concepts and Technologies.

Conservation Data Management and Analysis-Graduate Certificate (stackable)

  • You’ll start with an overview of research project design including tools for acquiring, managing, and presenting conservation data. Learn how to visualize, interpret, and communicate data with hands-on experience in current applications, and foundational concepts in mapping and geospatial analysis.
  • Courses: BCM 705 Conservation Research and Monitoring; BCM 730 Data Analytics and Visualization; BCM 750 Spatial Analysis and Mapping.

Conservation Leadership, Policy, and Management-Graduate Certificate (stackable)

  • You’ll focus on conservation project management, including grant writing, budgeting, building partnerships, cultural competency, leading diverse teams, ethics and advocacy, strategic planning, communications, and developing an understanding of treaties, laws, and policies.
  • Courses: BCM 710 Conservation Design and Management; BCM 720 Human Dimensions of Conservation; BCM 740 Conservation Leadership and Community Engagement.

Foundations of Biodiversity Conservation and Management-Graduate Certificate (foundational)

  • This certificate provides an introduction to the field by covering topics in conservation science, data management, and leadership.
  • The curriculum consists of the first course in each of the stackable certificates.
  • Courses and credits earned in this certificate apply to the stackable certificates and master’s degree, should you choose to continue in any of the programs.
  • Courses: BCM 700 Conservation Ecology; BCM 705 Conservation Research and Monitoring; BCM 710 Conservation Design and Management.

Experience UW Biodiversity Conservation and Management

Learn about biodiversity conservation and management, meet the faculty, read student stories, and more. Read the blog.